Bach Unplugged

I had vaguely heard of Albert Schweitzer, without knowing too much about him. A peace activist and humanitarian, a theologian, a man of good works. Built some sort of hospital in Africa? That, and a mental picture of a guy with a big white moustache was about it.

schweitzer

Not just a generous moustache

He was all of those things – and the mo was certainly impressive – but Dr Albert Schweitzer was also an important musician. He was an organist, one of great talent and also a keen thinker about music. He loved the works of J.S. Bach and he wanted to rescue his hero from the excesses of the 19th century Romantic style. Bach should be played, Schweitzer, argued, in the simpler, stripped down style of Bach’s own time. In modern terms, he wanted unplugged rather than prog-rock.

In 1934, while spending some time in England, he was recorded playing the organ at Queen’s Hall in London, and one of the pieces, “When In Deepest Need” is on this disc. This gentle, reflective piece was written by Bach literally on his death bed. It is at nearly five minutes, a rather long piece to fit onto a 12-inch shellac record, playing at 78 rpm, manufactured in 1934. His Master’s Voice managed to do this by the simple expedient of making the label for this side of the disc unusually small. The picture below shows the labels on the two sides of the disc, next to the same blue-framed sticker.

The record has been played a great many times – there is no escaping the crackle of hundreds of hollow steel styli which have scraped away at the shellac. Even so, the playing is beautiful, restrained. The organ can be a Donald Trump of an instrument – all blare and bombast – but Albert Schweitzer had a different vision, a subtle expression of a dying man’s love and faith.

  • Artist: Dr Albert Schweitzer
  • Title: J.S. Bach: When in Deepest Need / My Heart is Longing
  • Track: A side, “When in Deepest Need”
  • Format: 12” shellac disc, 78rpm
  • Label: His Master’s Voice C.1543
  • Manufactured in: Australia
  • Year: 1934

Many of the records featured on this blog, and hundreds of others, are for sale via Discogs.

 

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